The Blobfish

th (2)

Okay, you’ve probably seen this little guy before, but I just couldn’t consider my “Bizarre” collection complete without adding him. This is the Blobfish. He was voted the ugliest animal in the world. Poor guy.

Blobfish look like they do because they live so deep in the ocean (2,000-4,000 feet deep) where the water pressure is up to 120 times greater than it is at sea level. That pressure would explode the bones of normal creatures.

Found near Australia and Tasmania, the Blobfish (or Psychrolutes Marcidus as it’s more formally called) have practically no muscles. Their bodies are like gelatinous masses. They don’t have swim bladders that help most fish stay afloat either, but luckily, their bodies are less dense than the water, so they’re good. They just float near the bottom of the ocean all day eating whatever is unlucky enough to float or swim by their mouths.

They’re very rare, and I wouldn’t recommend trying to swim down to the bone-crushing depths to try to see one. Just be content looking at pictures online.

hqdefault

The Sarcastic Fringehead

sarcastic-fringehead-fish-ugly

The Sarcastic Fringehead doesn’t let its small size deter it from aggressively lying in wait to attack anyone foolish enough to get too close to its home. Living in shells, crevices or the stray tin can or boot that finds its way down to the ocean floor, the Sarcastic Fringehead is very territorial and ferocious. If another fish, or even a human diver, comes within attacking distance, this vicious fish will spring, opening its mouth to its fullest size and baring its razor-sharp teeth. If this ever happens to you, it’s best to retreat quickly trying to outswim the angry little fish who will most likely chase after you.

Sarcastic fringehead1

These fish are usually around 6 to 8 inches, but they can grow up to a foot long, and they live mostly off the Pacific coast of North America. They’re more scientifically known as Neoclinus Blanchardi, but perhaps the more common name suits them better.

Watch the video below to see two Sarcastic Fringeheads going at it. Notice how they attack each other with their mouths. This way, they can determine who is bigger, and as a result, who wins the fight.

Sea Pigs

Image

You’ve probably never before seen these strange slug-like creatures called sea pigs, but they are actually very abundant all over the world, especially in the northern Atlantic Ocean, eastern Pacific Ocean and in central and south America. These sea pigs, also called sea cucumbers or scotoplanes, live on the deep sea floor around 3.7 miles under the ocean surface. They tread water using their tube-like feet, of which they have from five to seven, and shove food into their mouths with their tentacles. They usually have around ten of these. Their name is most likely connected to their fat, gelatinous body.  

These unusual creatures travel in groups. The larger the group, the smaller the sea pigs, and the smaller the groups, the larger the sea pigs. A very sociable species, they make up the majority of the deep-sea population.

Image